Preschool

Physical Therapy

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Pediatric Physical Therapy is an important member of the team participating in the prognosis and the intervention of children who are experiencing functional limitations. We help to insure that children with developmental difficulties are functioning well in the least restrictive environment for them. Our goal is to decrease impairments and functional limitations to increase a child’s abilities. This is accomplished by improving developmental tasks, balance, coordination, motor planning, motor control, and strength. This may include determining the need for adaptive equipment such as braces, walkers, and wheelchairs.

At Shelby Hills Early Childhood Center, the Physical Therapy Department embraces the play based therapy philosophy. Most of the therapy that is provided is done during play so that the children enjoy and actively participate in therapy. Many of our children enjoy and look forward to playing in the gross motor room.

Bracing

We measure and cast for custom and off the shelf braces for children’s feet and lower legs. When bracing is done at a young age, it can provide good alignment of the feet and ankles and allow for bone growth to happen in this position. When bone growth happens with the feet and ankles in good alignment, the child can outgrow the need for the braces. Many of the children who graduate from Shelby Hills Early Childhood Center no longer need braces or shoe inserts to give them the support at the feet and ankles.

Gross Motor Play

Some examples of gross motor play that families can do together to support gross motor development are:

  • Playing tag or hide and seek to encourage running.
  • Swimming
  • Bike riding
  • Going to a playground and playing on and climbing the equipment
  • Lying on the floor on your stomach while playing games or coloring
  • Tossing balls back and forth or at targets
  • Playing baseball or teeball
  • Log rolling

Gross Motor Milestones

According to the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, Second Edition, a child should be able to jump up so that their feet leave the ground by 24 months of age. A child should be able to balance on one foot for about 3 seconds by the age of 31 months. At about 41 months of age, a child should be able to catch a playground ball that is tossed to them from about 5 feet with just their hands. By the age of 51 months, a child should be able to gallop with smooth weight shift for about 10 feet.

Physical Therapy Department

Please stop and see us if you have any questions or we can be reached by phone at Shelby Hills Early Childhood Center or by our individual E-Mails.

Jennifer (Jenna) Braun has been a Physical Therapy Assistant since 1998. She is a graduate of University of Toledo and Professional Skills Institute. She has brought a lot of experience and knowledge to the Shelby County Board of Developmental Disabilities when she joined us in 2007.

Elizabeth (Beth) Scott has been a Physical Therapist since 1994. She is a graduate of Bowling Green State University. Beth works closely with the PTA’s to provide the quality service that the students at Shelby Hills Early Childhood Center deserve and have come to expect. She has been with the Shelby County Board of Developmental Disabilities since 2002.

Andrea Spencer has been a Physical Therapist since 1996. She is a graduate of University of Toledo. She shares her expertise with both the Wee School and Shelby Hills Early Childhood Center. Andrea has been an important member of the team at the Shelby County Board of Developmental Disabilities since 2006.

Molly Zimpfer has been a Physical Therapy Assistant since 1998.  She is a graduate of Lima Technical College.  She has been employed with Shelby County Board of Developmental Disabilities since 1998.